Messages referencing
#hispanicheritagemonth
 

Honored to attend the #HispanicHeritageMonth exhibit at @Osceola_Arts this afternoon. We are proud to embrace our heritage, culture, and community through the art of our immensely talented artists in Florida.

 

#TeamSoto joined the celebration of #HispanicHeritageMonth with @OrangeCoFL this week. We are so thrilled to join @OCFLMayor Demings to honor these local Hispanic leaders!

 

As #HispanicHeritageMonth comes to a close, I want to highlight @LASDHQ Sheriff Alex Villanueva, 35-year veteran of the U.S.'s largest Sheriff’s Dept, commanding nearly 18,000 staff.  He is a military veteran who served in the @usairforce, @AirGuardCAHQ & CA Army National Guard.

I think this story resonates with so many Latinos especially here in South TX. Thank you Rep. Joaquín Castro (D-TX-20) for telling us your story #HispanicHeritageMonth Many third-generation Hispanics don’t speak Spanish, but their parents do. Why?
ksat.com → Many third-generation Hispanics don’t speak Spanish, but their parents do. Why?

 

Thanks to @SarahAcosta at @ksatnews for her important story on why many second- and third-generation Latinos don’t speak Spanish or don’t speak it fluently.

For decades it was illegal to speak Spanish in Texas schools.

Children were punished, some beaten, if caught speaking it.

 

Getting a language beaten out of them caused many Latinos to refuse to teach the language to their kids in order to protect them.

So many times over the years I’ve been asked by mostly white journalists questions that imply that my lack of Spanish fluency makes me less Latino.

 

And also by Latino journalists, often immigrants themselves, who imply the same thing.

If you came here from Latin America and speak perfect Spanish, great. But please don’t question others’ identity w/o knowing our nation’s history/treatment of earlier generations of Latinos.

Rep. Castro was commenting on this link from ksat.com
Many third-generation Hispanics don’t speak Spanish, but their parents do. Why?
A Pew Research Center study found that nearly 70% of second generation Latinos in U.S. are bilingual and fewer than a quarter of third generation Hispanics speak Spanish.